Beer: It’s What’s for Sale

As you may have ascertained from reading previous posts of mine, complaining about what frustrates or even infuriates me is an endeavor in which I have taken part. To sometimes appease those visions of red, I cool down with a choice beverage. But, just for your reading pleasure, my pessimism has found a way to infiltrate my beer drinking pastime and has found the topic itself to be worthy of my general disappointment. To be more specific, beer advertisements are so insulting to our collective intelligence, but what’s even worse? They work. There is a catch however: a positive one at that.

Many of you have seen the Coors Light commercial with John Brenkus from ESPN Sports Science and the adoptive “celebrity” spokesperson for Coors, Ice Cube. As seen in said commercial, the premise of their entire ad campaign is that their beer is cold. This ingenious, bastion of marketing techniques that required so much out of the box thinking and university trained sales practices has yielded a lot of success for those who employ it. That is unfathomable. Whether it’s the silver bullet train covered in ice, the two frosted bearded men rappelling in a glacier to remove beer bottle crystals, the “cold-activated” Rocky Mountain features on the cans turning blue when your beer is cold, or the assertion that the beer company’s distribution trucks are kept at a lower temperature than the rest is just so absurd as a way to entice people to buy beer. What do we learn from those infantile in complexity ploys? We want beer, we like it cold, and we don’t care what it tastes like. But, fortunately, American consumers are beginning to shed this dead weight of marketing idiocy rivaled only by the Budweiser horses whose relevance is still beyond me. They are doing so in favor of the growing Microbrewery resurgence in the U.S.

Two centuries ago, this country was an artisan beer market. Many German immigrants had traveled here and used similar hops and barley on their new American farms as they had grown in Bavaria and the regions their families inhabited overseas. The abundance of fresh water running through virtually every rural hillside and valley led to the popularization of home brewing and distilling. As a result, when the industrial revolution took shape in America, many factories were created to produce beer and would qualify today as microbreweries. Americans consumed an exorbitant amount of alcohol in that time period which eventually led to the period of Prohibition which resulted in the closure of many of these family owned breweries who could then not afford to reopen after the repeal of Prohibition due to high costs of registration, licensing, and a growing emphasis on health and safety regulations in factories. America lost a lot of its beer brewing heritage which was not revitalized post Prohibition until recently. In fact, the only reason why MIller, Budweiser, Coors, and a few others are popular today is due to their incessant advertising campaigns combined with growing sophistication of bottling practices and the beer containers themselves.

America’s big names in beer, responsible for 99% of our Super Bowl commercials are all lager producers. In fact, 90% of the American beer market is lager. They are lighter in color, thinner in body, watery in taste, low in flavor, and extremely low in alcohol content (so you drink/buy more and it’s cheaper to produce). Microbrews are bringing back into the market a higher quality, higher alcohol by volume product with more flavor, complexity, and greater opportunity for specialization than in the American lager market. Hopefully, this trend will continue and we can reject the supposed appeal of a beer company whose unique characteristic is the beer’s temperature.

Here are a list of some breweries that are worth your attention.

Terrapin Brewing Company

Favorite Offering: Hopsecutioner-American style IPA

Founders Brewing Company

Favorite Offering: Breakfast Stoudt

Dogfish Head Brewing Company

Favorite Offering: 60 minute IPA

Troegs Brewing Company:

Favorite Offering(s): Perpetual IPA and Pale Ale

Flying Dog Brewery:

Favorite Offering(s): Raging Bitch-Belgian IPA and Doggy Style-Pale Ale

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The Land of Opportunity?

We all know them.  The stereotypical, cliché sayings about America.  Land of the Free and Home of the Brave, The Great Melting Pot, A Land of Opportunity.  These sayings stir national pride in most Americans.  However, are these just old, crazy sayings that we say in order to hearken back to some bygone age of glory and nationalistic fervor? Is America really a place where an individual can come and be free?  Do we really cherish the sacrifices made by our heroes, here and abroad?  Does America really embrace diversity?  Do we as a nation celebrate each other for our differences?  Is America the place that provides equal opportunity for its citizens to succeed?  I think that these are very valid questions, not only for the nation as a whole, but for us personally.  I want to beg you not to misread me here.  I am not saying that I hold disdain for the many freedoms that I have under the Constitution.  Moreover, I am definitely not saying that I do not appreciate the sacrifice that thousands of men and women make daily so that I can enjoy these freedoms. I’m simply asking questions about how America really works.

Now, through the process of reaching my dream of making it big (in social work) (sarcasm), I have constantly been challenged to think on these questions.  Social Justice is one of the main Social Work Core Values.  Thus, in relation to this post I am rather biased on this hot button issue for myself, because I think that this is an important issue that should be talked about on all levels.

America.  This brings up a lot of different things for a lot of different people.  Should it ever be thought of as cruel, oppressive, or unfair?  I personally don’t think so.  Personally, I think that America should be thought of as a beautiful country, one that provides a level ground for individuals looking to better themselves.  A place that one can come to and find security and refuge from any circumstance.  It should be thought of as a country that takes care of its own.

Henry Kissinger recently posted something online that was in the same vein of things I have seen popping up all over social media.  These posts have been addressing our current Welfare system and how, in essence, they are sick and tired of having to pay for “takers”, individuals who use the system to support themselves when they are fully capable of getting a job.  This is such a fascinating perspective.  The assumptions that fuel this line of thinking are mostly based on personal experiences.  Whether these are people that we know/heard of that “use” the system, or simply just our life experiences and how we have seen life work.  Usually I would be like, “hey that’s your opinion and that’s cool,” but it really isn’t.  Webster defines greed as “the selfish desire to have more of something (usually money)”. People don’t like the “takers” because it’s their thought that they are having their money, time, or whatever, taken from them just for people to leech off the system. I do not think that this is an inherently bad quality to have the ambition or hunger for more, but it definitely is a slippery slope to desire things for personal gain at the expense of others. (In broad historical scopes, see Jackson and the Cherokee, Napoleon, Hitler, Cortez, Escobar, etc.)

As a white, middle class, male who lives in a suburban/rural area, my life has been pretty easy.  There was nothing really standing in my way of the things that I wanted to do with my life.  Even when I was in middle school, college was just a given.  That is what you do after high school.  And when we take a look at my primary and secondary education it was pretty darn good.  The teachers were all well-trained and we had fantastic learning materials: new books, mobile laptop carts, Smart boards with projectors in almost every classroom.  I mean our school was decked out with some pretty sweet things that made learning fun and interesting.  The staff of the school was fantastic, really loved doing their jobs and had a passion for the students.  This education really prepared me for what I would experience when I eventually attended college.  If this was the same across the board for every American, then yes Henry, it would be unfair for you to pay to support those who have had the same amount of chances as you, in similar circumstances.  Unfortunately for everyone, this is not even close to reality.

The fact of the matter is that we all know of schools where we would never want to send our kids, neighborhoods in which we would never want to drive through, let alone live in.  And we all know the “kind of people who live in those neighborhoods, and go to those schools.  And they deserve it, don’t they?  If they would only get a job, then they could move out to the suburbs, and then their kids could go to better schools.  And then I could finally stop paying for their housing, food, health insurance, addiction, etc.  Since they do not contribute, then they should bear the full weight of their incompetence, why should we that work, and work hard, pay for their laziness or petty wants?  If they actually wanted to be contributing members of society, then they should have their basic rights to survival, correct?

I want to take us back to the questions in the beginning, is everyone starting from the same place?  Let me set it up for us.  You live in the city, and we aren’t talking Upper Manhattan here. For those of you Susquehanna Valley’ers, think Reading or Altoona or Allison Hill in Harrisburg.  You have been born into a family without money.  So naturally your apartment complex or project is not adequate for your, or anyone’s needs.  Over-crowded, poor maintenance, “bad part of the neighborhood”, the odds are stacked against you.  Your mom works two minimum wage jobs in order to support your family, because your dad walked out on your family before you were born.  Your mother also had to drop out of high school when she was pregnant with your older sibling, thus limiting her potential job opportunities.  Even though she works two jobs it is still not enough to pay for everything, so you have to stand in a different line than your friends in school for your lunch.  Because your mom does not have time, you have never applied for a Child Health Insurance Program (CHIP).  So, when you get sick you don’t go to the doctor and have to miss extra days of school.  Because of your tardiness, due to lack of transportation, and persistent inability to focus, you are tracked as needed extra support.  As a result of this you then are separated from your friends in school because you have to attend special programs and classes, so that your school does not lose their already scarce funding.  Little does the school know, your lack of attention in class is a result of never having enough to eat.  The embarrassment of being the “poor kid” that gets the “unfair” free lunch is too much for you, your friends mean the world to you.  The school is so concerned about test scores and funding because they are already working with textbooks that are over 10 years old and in poor condition, and their class sizes average 40 or more students.  The teachers are usually either right out of college or those that other schools do not want, so dealing with “problem children” is usually not high on their priority list.  (There are still some great teachers that work in inner-city school districts) Because of your age and wanting to fit in, you begin rebelling as you grow up.  You get mixed up in the “wrong crowd” and your school work suffers even more.  Your home life is as volatile as ever.  Your mother is doing what she can but she is not around enough to really be a contributing part of your life and your older sibling wants nothing to do with you because you are not cool enough to hang out with them.  As a result you begin to look for love in other places.  Because of your ignorance regarding safe sex and inability to obtain contraceptive devices, you start a family as a teenager.  Rinse and Repeat the whole process.  Is this your fault?  Really?

I know what you’re thinking, and you’re not wrong.  This is a completely fabricated story and there are a lot of things that might not be true, as this point is only made for the sake of argument.  But there are a lot things that are more common than we think.  And the bottom line is when we see someone, do we ever really know what they have had to deal with to be in the place that they are.  The answer is no.  This story is an example of how it may be out of someone’s control, or capability to really and truly “pull themselves up by their boot straps.”

This brings me full circle.  Do any of us pull ourselves up by the boot straps?  I mean the only person that I can think of that truly did this would be like, Abe Lincoln, who wasn’t as underprivileged growing up as we are led to believe, and he was still white.  The rest of us receive immense help from the government.  Public Schools, tax breaks, subsidies for big business, banking and SEC regulations, etc.  Does that mean that because you were born into a certain family, you are better than others?  Is that what it comes down to?  Because your family makes more money, you’re a better person?  Because your school was funded properly, you get to judge?  Because you have white skin, you get to discriminate?  Because you were given what you need to succeed, you can expect success from those who weren’t?  I think that we need to check ourselves as a nation. We need to think to ourselves, have I really thought about, researched, or talked to anyone who has had a different experience in life than I have?  What if the tables were turned, would I want to be judged and discriminated against for things that are outside of my control? How can I really know how I would react in the same scenario without actually being placed in it?

Talk to your friends about this.  Talk to people who think different from you about this.  Talk to everyone about this.  Think about these things, and keep an open mind. Because someone else has had a different experience and opinion than you, doesn’t mean you should slam the door shut on them. To wrap up, how do we make America the Land of the Free and the Home of the Brave,  a true and celebrated Melting Pot,  a place where everyone can experience the Land of Opportunity? I personally don’t have the answer to this, but through open-minded dialogue and taking appropriate action, I think we can strive toward this perceived goal.

I Can Wait to See You Again : Another Author’s Opinion on Hannah Erotica

Although I don’t disagree with the opinion voiced by my cowriter, Mr Madison, I would just like to expound on those thoughts while they’re still fresh in everyone else’s mind. Granted, this is all giving Miley Cyrus more attention than she is deserved, but what this writer writes about her isn’t going to affect her inflated ego one way or the other.

I agree with Madison about the fact that we need to be more conscious about the messages that crap Top 40 music is sending us as the listneners. In today’s day and age, it’s easy to avoid the Ryan Seacrest hosted music scene that comes with the garbage that is played over the radio on a daily basis. There’s XM radio, iPods, talk radio, or even CDs to listen to before you turn your radio dial to any popular music station. If you don’t want to be inundated with the trash flow that is played on the radio these days (irregardless of content, the music itself is bad), you have about another million options. And if you don’t want your kids listening to that music, set the precedent in the household that that is simply not the norm. Pretty easily done.

But then, how many of you actually sat down and intentionally watched the VMA’s? I know I sure didn’t, but I was still bombarded with images or news about what happened during them. I chose to watch a much better production in Breaking Bad on my Sunday night, but I was still made well aware of the happenings on MTV. Pretty much any internet news site or social network was completely exploding with VMA information whether you wanted it or not. Every memebase on the web started cranking out VMA related memes that hit the internet as fast as pictures of cats do. Which then leads to people talking about it at your work, or amongst your friends, or in your family. And it’s all part of a genius system, that attracts your attention to something so that it stays relevant.

And then what happens once you see and hear everyone talking about it? You get online and watch the performance yourself. And then, when you hear the song you realize it has a catchy tune you can’t get out of your head, which you hear the next time you accidentally turn on the radio. Which then leads you to turn on the radio more often, leading you to have your brain turned to mush by the dumpster bin quality of what is being played. And then when the moment of clarity comes when you realize what the catchy song is really about, you either don’t care enough to try and change, or you just stop listening to it. Either way though, you bought into The System.

One thing is certain, is that something needs to change. The System has gotten so good, so rich, and so powerful, that unless you literally live underneath a rock, you’re guaranteed to hear about the dunghill news that the entertainment biz cranks out on a daily basis. Whether you choose to invest any actual time and or money into it is a different matter, but it doesn’t change the fact that somehow, somewhere, you’re going to hear about it. And quite simply, that’s a huge problem. Blame it on America, capitalism, the FCC, the degradation of basic morals, whatever. But the fact will always remain that somehow, you’re to blame.

In a system based on greed, the person with the most wins. The most money, viewers, listeners, fans, stuff, etc. In a country where success is equated with excess, bigger is better as long as bigger means more. There’s even a television show based on people who do nothing but hoard things. We rank people and businesses based on the value of their assets, or what they have, instead of who they are and what they do. Album sales matter, not album content. Ratings matter, not what is being displayed on television. Quantity wins over quality every single day without contest.

So how do we avoid more Miley Cyrus controversy? It’s not by restricting what can or cannot be shown on television, or forcing strict morals on society, or issuing harsh statements from conservative watchdog groups. It’s by as a society on the whole, becoming less materialistic and greedy. Remember the old Chinese proverb, “Give a man a fish, feed him for a day. Teach a man to fish, feed him for a lifetime.” Sure, banning Miley in your household is going to make a temporary difference, but instilling values that don’t consist of the need to accumulate things is what is going to make the lasting difference. When you no longer care about the inane materialism that is in most pop songs, not only will you stop listening to that genre of music and all it glorifies, but you won’t even care to tune into MTV anymore, or the VMA’s specifically for that matter.

Does this all mean that I think it’s okay for Miley Cyrus’ disgusting performance being so raunchy and on basic cable that it overshadows that of Lady Gaga, who chose to wear a thong on-stage? I certainly don’t think so, but I don’t think that the immorality is the inherent problem. Regardless of whether you care (watch) about the VMA’s or not, The System has learned exactly how to maniuplate people into getting what they want. It’s built by people who want or have fame and fortune, as they project that image onto millions of other people who in turn desire the same thing. And if those aren’t your priorities, then you simply won’t buy into the System. The more people that don’t buy into it, the less profitable it will be, and the less we’ll hear about it. It’s not a quick fix, but it certainly is not going to be, after decades of the focal point of this country being the accumulation of wealth and power. Everything in moderation, especially Miley Cyrus.